From the Virginia Feminist Oral History Project Collection

Creating a Progressive Commonwealth:

Women Activists, Feminism, and Politics of Social Change in Virginia, 1970s-2000s



James Branch Cabell Library, Lecture Hall (Room 303)
901 Park Ave., Richmond, Va. 23284


The 2,999,999th volume is The Virginia Feminist Oral History Project, 2013–2014 by Megan Shockley, Ph.D., a collection of born-digital oral histories made available online through Special Collections and Archives via a finding aid. Shockley’s donation of this material makes it possible for VCU Libraries to preserve and provide access to the voices of second-wave feminists throughout Virginia. In a talk titled “Creating a Progressive Commonwealth: Women Activists, Feminism, and the Politics of Social Change in Virginia, 1970s–2000s,” she discusses her work on and findings from the project. The talk is followed by a reception.

VCU Libraries celebrates the 3-millionth addition to its library collections in 2018 with a series of events called Milestones. The events highlight the 2,999,999th volume (an oral history collection featuring second-wave feminists in central Virginia), the 3,000,000th volume (a seminal new book about treatment of traumatic brain injury, co-authored by David X. Cifu, M.D., chair of VCU’s Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation) and the 3,000,001st volume (an artists’ book by VCU alumna Colette Fu).

This event, like every event in the Milestones series, is free and open to all, but please register. For special accommodations, please call the VCU Libraries Events Office at (804) 828-0593 at least two days prior to the event.

Schedule and Registration

Please complete this online form.

About the Speaker

Megan Shockley, Ph.D., is the author of the forthcoming Combating Southern Patriarchy: Virginia Feminists and the Politics of Social Change (Louisiana State University Press, 2018), which draws from the oral histories that make up The Virginia Feminist Oral History Project, the 2,999,999th volume to be added to VCU Libraries’ collection. She is also the author of Changing History: Virginia Women Through Four Centuries (with Cynthia Kierner and Jennifer Loux) (Library of Virginia Press, 2013), The Captain’s Widow of Sandwich: Self-Invention and the Life of Hannah Rebecca Burgess, 1834–1917 (New York University Press, 2010) and We, Too, Are Americans’: African American Women in Detroit and Richmond, 1940–1954 (University of Illinois Press, 2004). She teaches courses in museum studies, heritage tourism, digital history and women’s history at Clemson University. She is the coordinator of the Public History Emphasis Area Program and supervises internships and is a project manager on the Palmetto History Project.


Tribute to Patsy Ticer

Have your purchased your ticket to the Tribute to Patsy Ticer?
If not, click here now.
There are few women who have had a more profound influence on Alexandria than our beloved Patsy Ticer. As the first female Mayor of Alexandria and as a Virginia State Senator, Patsy dedicated her life to those less fortunate; to improving the quality of education, especially for our youngest learners; and to making our community a better place to live and work. The Alexandria Commission for Women and the Friends of the Alexandria Commission for Women are very honored to be recognizing Patsy and her many contributions at a very special Tribute to Patsy Ticer. We hope you will be part of it.
The event, which will include a cocktail reception and program highlighting her life, will be held on Monday, March 19, 2018 at the George Washington Masonic National Memorial, located at 101 Callahan Dr., Alexandria, VA.
Tickets are $50 and again, you can purchase them here.

We the Women Exhibition

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, the National Archives will launch a nationwide initiative and major exhibition that explores the generations-long fight for universal woman suffrage. Our fundraising event – We the Women – will serve as a launching point for this bold initiative and help provide financial support for the National Archives. The Exhibition will include:
  • Speakeasies, specialty cocktails and tasting stations from women-owned and led businesses including Drink Company, Columbia Room, Denizens Brewing Company, Chaia, Catoctin Creek Distilling Company, Gray Wolf Craft Distillery, Lyon Distilling Company, and Republic Restoratives
  • Light hors d’oeurves
  • Historic suffragist documents on view
  • Live jazz and swing music
  • Dance lessons including the “Charleston” by GottaSwing
  • Make your own suffragist-themed buttons and sashes
  • Chat with Archives curators and historians
  • After-hours access to museum exhibits
  • Themed photo booth
  • Cocktail attire, suffragist white — or come in 1920’s era theme (suffragist, Gatsby, etc.). There will be stations and props to help you get in character.
Purchase Tickets Here
Any amount paid in excess of $85/ticket is considered an unrestricted donation and is fully deductible as provided by law. Proceeds from We the Women will support the National Archives’ Rightfully Hers Initiative and Exhibition and the digitization of women’s records.
 *On behalf of the National Archives Foundation

Act NOW to Support the ERA

House Committee on Privileges and Elections to Consider United States Constitution; Equal Rights Amendment



TITLE: United States Constitution; Equal Rights Amendment

ACTION: Call your legislators and urge them to support HJ 2, 4 & 129! These are great resolutions with bipartisan support. It’s time for Virginia to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment. It has been ratified by 36 states, including Nevada just last year. This resolution advocates that the General Assembly ratify the ERA. Now is the time for equal rights for women!

Only two more states are needed to ratify; Virginia could be one of them. The bills ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment are already gaining bipartisan support. In fact, Republican Delegate Roxann Robinson has filed a House bill and John McGuire is a co-patron. Expanding this to a bipartisan majority will give the General Assembly national accolades for its leadership during these contentious times.

The ERA will give Congress greater Constitutional authority to enact legislation to protect women. Without this, legislation protecting women could be invalidated, as happened in 2000, when the Supreme Court struck down the civil remedy provision of the Violence Against Women Act.
Ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment is good politics for Virginia, especially now when national attention is focused on women’s issues and technology companies are looking to locate in welcoming sites in the Southeast. Ratifying the ERA would attract such companies to Virginia.
For additional talking points:

PATRONS: HJ 2: Kaye Kory; chief co-patrons Eileen Filler-Corn; Jennifer Carroll Foy; Hala Ayala; HJ 4: Alfonso Lopez; HJ 129: Roxanne Robinson; chief co-patron Kaye Kory

If your Delegate is on the list below, call and say why you support this joint resolution.
Or email: (fill in your Delegate’s first initial and last name)
Find your Delegate here:



Join a Centennial Commemoration  “Night of Terror”

The Workhouse Arts Center Prison Museum and
The Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association present:

Centennial Commemoration 
“Night of Terror”

Sunday, November 12, 2017

Workhouse Arts Center, Bldg W-16 Gallery
9518 Workhouse Road, Lorton, Virginia 20079

On November 14, 1917, thirty-two women arrested for picketing the White

House for the right to vote were beaten, chained, and force-fed at the Occoquan Workhouse. It came to be known as “The Night of Terror.” Their indomitable strength and sacrifice helped turn the tide in efforts to have the 19th Amendment passed. Ratification eventually occurred in 1920. Help us celebrate and commemorate this important turning point in the history of the suffrage movement in the United States and remember these remarkable women known as the Silent Sentinels.


  • “Struggle for the Vote,” a talk by suffrage historian, Dr. Elisabeth Griffith
  • Staged, dramatic reading of the Occoquan suffragists’ own accounts
  • NY Metropolitan Museum of Art quartet-in-residence, PUBLIQuartet presents world premiere of commissioned work, “Silent Sentinels”
  • Anthems of protest led by Capital Harmonia community women’s chorus
  • Ceremonial Bell Ringing — Remembering the 32

Registration is free; Donations appreciated

**Limited seating available**

Register Now!


The Turning Point Suffragist Memorial Association is a 501(c)(3)non-profit raising funds to build a national suffragist memorial at NOVA Parks’ Occoquan Regional Park, in Lorton, Va.
Mission: To educate, inspire, and empower present and future generations to remain vigilant in the quest for equal rights.

Join Susan Swecker to Support Women Running in Rural Districts

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Time: 7:00PM – 9:00PM
Location: the home of Melissa Harrison, 110 E. Braddock Rd. Alexandria, 22301. Open street parking, residential neighborhood

Please join DPVA Chairwoman Susan Swecker, Alexandria City Councilman John Chapman, and House of Delegate candidates Stephanie Cook (HD-09 – Franklin, Henry, and Patrick Counties), Natalie Short (HD-23 – Lynchburg, Bedford, Amherst Counties) and Angela Lynn (HD-25 – Augusta, Albemarle, and Rockingham Counties).

This election cycle is seeing unprecedented Democratic energy on the ground all across Virginia. But reaching constituents in rural districts takes a lot more effort and resources. The purpose of this event is to show solidarity and raise money for three women candidates running in rural areas of Central and Southwest Virginia. Let’s show rural Virginia Democratic voters that we stand with them!

Host committee: Ashkan Bayanpour, Jill Caiazzo, Jessica Church, Leo Cruz, Marvin Figueroa, Bishop Garrison, Marj Signer, Terron Sims, Monique Alcala

Contribution levels: $250.00, $100.00, $75.00, $25.00
Event link:


Call for Papers!

“1977-2017: The IWY National Women’s Conference In Retrospect”November 5-7, 2017, University of Houston

This year marks the 40th Anniversary of the 1977 National Women’s Conference, the domestic answer to the United Nations’ International Women’s Year initiative.  The Houston Conference, as it came to be known, was the largest federally mandated gathering of American women in history.  On this occasion, 2000 delegates elected from fifty states and six territories and roughly 16,000 observers came together to craft a twenty-six plank National Plan of Action, submitted to President Jimmy Carter in 1978.  The conference remains one of the most imaginative and wide-ranging exercises in civic engagement realized in the twentieth century, and we seek to draw attention to the diversity, ingenuity, and determination of participants who dared to dream up concrete policy goals of “what women want.”  The recent global response to the Women’s March on Washington suggests just how much the issues debated at the Houston Conference still resonate.

During a three day conference, November 5-7, we aim to take stock of this momentous feat as well as consider the separate concerns articulated at a “pro-family” counter-convention held in Houston simultaneously.  A scholarly academic symposium will coincide with a delegate and observer reunion. Commemorative activities will occur simultaneous to academic sessions and begin the prior weekend. In holding two events at once, we seek a cross-pollination of ideas and action, bringing together academics and activists, current and lifetime students and teachers, and those that remember being there alongside those who seek to carry the torch forward.

We would like to take the occasion of the 40th Anniversary of the National Women’s Conference to engage a fresh conversation about U.S. politics and society in the last quarter of the twentieth century. Issues debated at the Houston Conference have dominated American culture since: LGBTQ and racial civil rights; family planning and reproductive health; immigration and civil justice; access to education and childcare; welfare and government spending; poverty and wealth distribution; environmentalism; foreign policy priorities; globalization and a shifting workforce; and gender neutrality and protection in law. Likewise, we seek papers that engage these broad currents. Work that interrogates the conference itself, the context from which it developed, its prominent themes, and its legacy will be considered.  Papers need not focus on the conference per se or women’s history in general.  Rather, we aim to foster a dialogue about contemporary history and society using this conference-a barometer of its times-as a jumping off point.  We seek the participation of scholars who explore institutional politics, social movements, cultural conflicts, global and transnational politics, and economic turmoil.

We welcome individual paper proposals as well as complete or partial session proposals.  Format ranges from dynamic roundtable discussions to more traditional sessions with three papers and a chair/commentator.  We are especially interested in sessions that mix academic research with the experience of activists.  We envision this conference to be a forum for interdisciplinary thinking and encourage broad methodology, perspective, and disciplinary grounding (such as history, political science, public policy, English, economics, sociology, and the arts).

Questions that could be considered by participants include: Why did a policy forum that emerged from bi-partisanship become a caustic ideological battleground?  What political, economic, and social changes underway manifested reaction and response at this conference and the coinciding counter-conference?  In what ways do the issues considered at the National Women’s Conference still resonate?  Is the leading question asked then-what do women want?-still relevant today?

Ongoing activities include: poster/book sessions; oral history commons; film screenings; special collections tours; student-delegate issue dialogues; wikistorming edit-a-thon; self-guided walking tours.

Traditional paper session and roundtable proposals: Abstracts should include a short session description and title, individual paper titles, one page proposals of approximately 300 words for each paper, and one page CVs for all participants including chair/commentator.

Individual paper proposals: Abstracts should be 300 words, and should be accompanied by a one page CV.

While we do not promise travel support, please indicate on your proposal if you request such support should it become available. A separate application for these funds will be issued to selected participants should we have such funds to distribute. Priority consideration for such funds will be given to graduate students and adjuncts.

Submission deadline: August 10, 2017

Please submit applications as one PDF at:

For questions, please contact Nancy Beck Young:, or Leandra Zarnow:


“Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.”

We now have tangible proof that our efforts to re-start the ratification train have been successful, and know legislators in 2017 can be convinced to take the issue of Constitutional equality for women and men seriously enough to make an effort to bring it about.

Both the Nevada Senate and House have passed ratification resolutions, and as soon as a few very minor differences between the bills (technical adjustments regarding the resolution’s transmittal, not the relevant text) are ironed out, that State will officially become the 36th to ratify.

The votes weren’t the traditional cliffhangers: It was 13 to 8 in the Senate and 28 to 14 in the House, so this was a very strong endorsement by the state with the highest proportion of women (40%) in its state legislature. Among the women in the House gallery on Monday was former Lieutenant Governor Sue Wagner, a veteran of the first ratification campaign in Nevada four decades ago. Nevada’s Governor, Brian Sandoval, is a supporter of the E.R.A., though state governors play no role in ratification and need not sign (and cannot veto) a ratification resolution.

Fortunately, Nevada is not alone in regard to states where there are active campaigns to ratify.

Other states have come close to ratification, but fell short by a few votes, with the fact that no state had ratified since Indiana did so in January, 1977, used as an excuse to pretend that the E.R.A. was no longer a viable issue. But if Nevada says it’s a 21st Century issue, there’s no reason why Virginia, Florida, North Carolina, Illinois, or any other state where there’s an active campaign can’t be persuaded to ratify.

This ratification now adds momentum to our efforts, and pressure on Congress to take a stand on whether its original deadline in 1979 or the extended deadline of June 30, 1982 should still be valid. These deadlines were never a part of the E.R.A.’s text, but are in the proposing clause, so a simple majority vote in House and Senate could delete both deadlines if the Supreme Court agrees that such a move is valid. But the need for Congress to address the issue is directly proportional to how close we are to having 38 ratifications, so each new one is a major step toward that goal.

So let’s ratify nationwide once and for all!

Contact Your Elected Officials
Telephone numbers, physical and email addresses for every federal, state, and local elected leader.

Virginia NOW
Communications Director / Webmistress

“We are not safe until we have equality guaranteed by the Federal Constitution.”– Alice Paul

National Woman’s Party Convention, July 21, 1923


This is a list of Members of Congress who have endorsed at least one of the E.R.A. resolutions introduced in the present Congress. If you are one of their constituents, thank them for their support, then ask what they’re going to do to bring these E.R.A. resolutions to the floor for a vote, and assure passage in the present Congress. If your Senator or Representative is not on the list, ask why they haven’t gone on record as being in favor of Constitutional equality for women and men, something supported by 91% of the public and opposed by only 4%, according to a 2012 survey by Public Policy Polling, and is now supported by 94% of Americans in a 2016 “DB5” poll.


S.J.R. 5: 29 Supporters
(28 Democrats, 1 Independent) (Sen. Cardin, D-MD, plus 28 co-sponsors.)

California: Feinstein (D), Harris (D)
Connecticut: Blumenthal (D), Murphy (D) 
 Hirono (D)
Illinois: Durbin (D)  
 Cardin (D), Van Hollen (D)  
 Markey (D) & Warren (D)  
 Stabenow (D)
Minnesota: Franken (D) & Klobuchar (D)
New Hampshire: Hassan (D), Shaheen (D)  
New Jersey:
 Booker (D), Menendez (D)  
New Mexico:
 Heinrich (D), Udall (D)
New York: Gillibrand (D) 
 Brown (D)
Oregon: Merkley (D), Wyden (D)
Rhode Island: Reed (D), Whitehouse (D)  
 Sanders (I)  
 Kaine (D), Warner (D)  
 Baldwin (D)


H.J.R. 53: 146 supporters
(146 Democrats) Rep. Speier, D-CA, and 145 co-sponsors.
Two E.R.A. supporters are non-voting Delegates.

Arizona: Gallego (D), Grijalva (D), Sinema (D)  
 Barragan (D), Brownley (D), Cardenas (D), Chu (D), Davis (D),DeSaulnier (D), Eschoo (D), Garamendi (D), Huffman (D), Lee (D), Lieu (D) Lowenthal (D), Matsui (D), McNarney (D),Napolitano (D), Peters (D), Roybal-Allard (D), Ruiz (D),Sanchez, L. (D), Schiff (D), Sherman (D), Speier (D), Swalwell (D), Takano (D), Thompson (D) Torres (D), Vargas (D)  
 DeGette (D), Perlmutter (D)  
 Courtney (D), De Lauro (D), Himes (D), Larson (D)  
District of Columbia:
 Holmes Norton (D) (non-voting Delegate) 
 Castor (D), Crist (D), Deutch (D), Frankel (D), Hastings (D), Soto (D), Wasserman Schultz (D), Wilson (D).  
 Johnson (D) Guam: Bordallo (D) (non-voting Delegate)
Illinois : Bustos (D), Davis (D), Foster (D), Gutierrez (D), Kelly (D), Quigley (D), Rush (D), Schakowsky (D)
Indiana: Carson (D)
Iowa: Loebsack (D) 
 Yarmuth (D)  
 Richmond (D) 
 Pingree (D)  
 Cummings (D), Delaney (D), Raskin (D), Ruppersberger (D), Sarbanes (D)  
 Capuano (D), Clark (D), Keating (D), Kennedy (D), Lynch (D), McGovern (D), Moulton (D), Tsongas (D) 
 Conyers (D), Dingell (D), Kildee (D), Lawrence (D), Levin (D) 
 Ellison (D), McCollum (D), Nolan (D) Walz (D) 
 Clay (D)
Nevada: Kihuen (D), Rosen (D), Titus (D)
New Hampshire: Kuster (D), Shea-Porter (D)
New Jersey: Norcross (D), Pallone (D), Pascrell (D), Payne (D), Sires (D), Watson Coleman (D)  
New Mexico:
 Lujan Grisham (D) 
New York:
 Clarke (D), Engel (D), Espaillat (D), Higgins (D),Jeffries (D), Lowey (D), Maloney, S (D), Meeks (D), Nadler (D), Rice (D), Serrano (D), Slaughter (D), Tonko (D), Serrano (D), Velazquez (D)
North Carolina: Adams (D), Butterfield (D), Price (D)
Ohio: Beatty (D), Fudge (D), Kaptur (D), Ryan (D)
Oregon: Bonamici (D), Blumenauer (D), DeFazio (D), Schrader (D)
Pennsylvania: Boyle (D), Brady (D), Cartwright (D), Doyle (D), Evans (D)

Rhode Island : Cicilline (D), Langevin (D)
Tennessee: Cohen (D)
Texas: Gonzalez (D), Green (D), Jackson Lee (D), Johnson (D), Veasey (D)
Vermont: Welch (D) 
 Beyer (D), Connolly (D), Scott (D)
Washington: DelBene (D), Heck (D), Jayapel (D), Kilmer (D), Larsen (D), Smith (D) 
 Kind (D), Moore (D), Pocan (D)===================================

S.J.R. 6: 13 supporters, 13 Democrats).
(Sen. Menendez, D-NJ, and 11 co-sponsors)

California: Feinstein (D)
Connecticut: Murphy (D) Delaware: Carper (D), Coons (D)  
 Durbin (D)
Maryland: Cardin (D), Van Hollen (D)
Massachusetts: Markey (D), Warren (D)  
New Jersey:
 Booker (D) Menendez (D)
New York: Gillibrand (D)  
 Brown (D)


H.J.R. 33: 101 supporters
(96 Democrats, 5 Republicans)
(Rep. Maloney, D-NY, and 100 co-sponsors. One supporter, Holmes-Norton of D.C., is a non-voting Delegate.)

Arizona: Gallego (D), Grijalva (D)  
 Aguilar (D), Brownley (D), Capps (D), Cardenas (D), Chu (D), Davis (D), DeSaulnier (D), Eshoo (D), Huffman (D), Lee (D), Lieu (D) Lofgren (D), Matsui (D), Sanchez (D), Schiff (D), Speier (D), Sherman (D), Swalwell (D), Takano (D), Thompson (D)  
 DeGette (D), Polis (D) 
 Courtney (D), Larson (D)
Delaware: Rochester (D)  
District of Columbia:
 Holmes Norton (D) (non-voting Delegate) 
 Castor (D), Crist (D), Demings (D), Deutch (D), Hastings (D), Lawson (D), Wilson (D)  
 Bishop (D), Johnson (D), Scott (D)  
 Hanabusa (D) 
 Davis (D), Gutierrez (D), Kelly (D), Schakowsky (D)
Iowa: Loebsack (D)
Maine: Pingree (D)  
 Cummings (D), Delaney (D), Hoyer (D), Raskin (D), Sarbanes (D)
Massachusetts: Keating (D), Kennedy (D), Lynch (D), McGovern (D), Moulton (D), Tsongas (D)  
 Conyers (D), Dingell (D), Kildee (D), Lawrence (D) 
 Walz (D)  
 Thompson (D) 
 Clay (D) 
New Hampshire:
 Kuster (D), Shea-Porter (D)
New Jersey: Frelinghuysen (R), Gotheimer (D), Lance (R), LoBiando (R), Norcross (D), Pallone (D), Sires (D), Watson Coleman (D)
New Mexico: Lujan Grisham (D)  
New York:
 Clarke (D), Crowley (D), Engel (D), Espaillat (D), Higgins (D), Jeffries (D), Lowey (D), Maloney, C. (D), Meng (D), Nadler (D), Reed (R), Rice (D), Serrano (D), Velazquez (D).  
North Carolina:
 Adams (D)  
 Fudge (D)  
 Bonamici (D)
Pennsylvania: Boyle (D), Cartwright (D) Dent (R)
Rhode Island: Cicilline (D)  
 Cohen (D), Cooper (D)  
 Jackson Lee (D)  
 Beyer (D), Connolly (D), McEachin (D)
Washington: Larsen (D)
Wisconsin: Kind (D), Pocan (D)


 Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA)
MEMBERS: Blumenthal (D-CT). Coons (D-DE) Cornyn (R-TX), Crapo (R-ID) Cruz (R-TX), Durbin (D-IL), Feinstein (D-CA), Flake (R-AZ), Franken (D-MN), Graham (R-SC), Hatch (R-UT), Hirono (D-HI) Kennedy (R-LA) Klobuchar (D-MN), Leahy (D-VT), Lee (R-UT), Sasse (R-NE) Tillis (R-NC), Whitehouse (D-RI)

Sen. Chuck Grassley (202) 224-3744 @ChuckGrassley
Sen. Patrick Leahy (202) 224-4242 @SenatorLeahy


 Representative Bob Goodlatte (R-VA)
MEMBERS: Bass (D-CA), Chabot (R-OH), Chaffetz (R-UT), Chu (D-CA), Cicilline (D-RI), Cohen (D-TN), Conyers (D-MI), DeSantis (R-FL), Deutsch (D-FL) Farenthold (R-TX), Franks (R-AZ), Gohmert (R-TX), Goodlatte (R-VA) Gowdy (R-SC), Gutierrez (D-IL), Issa (R-CA), Jackson Lee (D-TX), Jeffries (D-NY) Johnson (D-GA), Jordan (R-OH), King (R-IA), Labrador (R-ID), Lieu (D-CA) Lofgren (D-CA), Marino (R-PA), Nadler (D-NY), Poe (R-TX), Richmond (D-LA) Sensenbrenner (R-WI), Smith (R-TX), Swalwell (D-CA)

Rep. Bob Goodlatte (202) 225-5431 @RepGoodlatte
Rep. John Conyers, Jr. (202) 225-5126 @RepJohnConyers


Rep. Ron DeSantis (R-FL), Rep. Trent Franks (R-AZ) Rep. Louis Gohmert (R-TX) Rep. Steve King (R-IA), Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC). Rep. Steve Cohen (D-TN)
Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD)

Special thanks to David Dismore for compiling all of this info!
Giving to Virginia NOW supports our mission for women’s economic, legal, social, and personal equality in all areas of life.  

PWC NOW Annual Meeting!



“Make Love, Not Babies” ♦️ Roe v. Wade Anniversary

Today is the 44th anniversary of Roe v. Wade! As I read through the tweets of people discussing the reasons they are grateful, I’m surprised by the lack of acknowledgement of what choice did for love and relationships.

We’re so used to having reproductive rights that we forget the most revolutionary part of choice.

Making love now involves you and your lover. You don’t have to live in a marriage where you fear becoming pregnant every…single…time you’re together.

We don’t have to live in a world where sex is only for the purpose of making babies and once we’re finished having children, we sleep in a different bedroom from our spouse for the remainder of our lives.

Life before the 1960s and 70s meant there was no birth control. There was no choice.

Now, making love can be about love. About desire. About connection. With the power of choice, sex is not solely for the purpose of procreating.

When I watch movies that were filmed before 1973, I see the layers of fear involving love making even between people truly in love. I realize the lack of intimacy freedom that existed. A freedom that today, we take for granted.

Period movies and historical shows filmed today have everyone rolling around with everyone and it’s completely unrealistic — but then again, we live in a world today with so much freedom, we assume it always existed on some level. We can’t really fathom any longer how different romantic relationships were before choice.

Unfortunately most of the defenses for choice today revolve around catastrophic pregnancy situations, not freedom and autonomy.

I am grateful for the freedom to exist without fear, to want any children I might have because they were not forced upon me, and to know above all else that I too, was wanted. I wasn’t a consequence, I was a gift. 🎈

Happy 44th Anniversary Roe vs. Wade!

Virginia NOW
Communications Director ♦️ Webmistress

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